Statement by the Indonesian Delegation

At the 3rd Standing Committee, on Youth Participation in the Democratic Process

The 122nd Asssembly Meeting of the Inter-Parliamentary Union

Bangkok, Thailand March 27th – April 1, 2010

Read by: Nova Riyanti Yusuf, MD, Psychiatrist

Mr.Chairman,

Fellow Parliamentarians,

Distinguished Delegates,

Ladies and Gentlemen,

Democracy means participation of the people in decision-making. While the increasing adults’ participation in the democratic process is necessary, we certainly need to pay more heed to address the participation of youth in the democratic process. I believe that increasing the opportunities for all young people to participate in the democratic process is one of the most effective means to promote democracy and the benefit from youth great potential.

In this context, my delegation holds the view that it is crucial to give young people a chance to participate in the political process. Education for young people concerning politics as well as more engagement between politicians and young people are extremely needed.

Indonesia supports the promotion and implementation of any constructive international resolutions on youth such as the United Nation’s World Program of Action for Youth, which highlights the necessity of youth participation in decision-making processes. This World Program of Actions for Youth can serve as an effective guidance on developing comprehensive role models for youth empowerment programs.

Indonesia affirms that deepening young people’s knowledge of democracy issues and practical skill training for conflict resolution and the promotion of “home-grown” democracy is extremely necessary.

At the regional level, Indonesia has initiated the Bali Democracy Forum which aims at promoting democracy in the region by strengthening democratic institutions through sharing of experiences and best practices among Asian countries. We are in the view that democracy must not be imposed but rather be allowed to evolve in accordance with local values, culture, and the aspirations of the people. To implement the recommendations of the Bali Democracy Forum, Indonesia also established the Institute for Peace and Democracy, whose one of the priority areas include the encouragement of youth participation in the democratic process.

Indonesia strongly encourages IPU member parliaments to create effective channels of communication and modes of operation among youth as a means to promote democracy, peace, and human rights, in this regard, in relations to the IPU Assembly, we would like to propose a sub-amendment to the draft resolution: one operative paragraph regarding the establishment of a meeting of young parliamentarians in the IPU Assemblies and an operative paragraph on regional cooperation through regional forums or institutions specializing on the promotion and advancement of democracy.

Indonesia emphasizes the importance of fostering democracy, mutual respect, tolerance and understanding among young people with different racial, cultural and religious backgrounds between nations. Indonesia supports all forms of initiatives to build dialogue related to building mutual-understanding and related respect for cultural and religious differences, through forums such as inter-faith dialogues and inter-civilizational dialogue, whether in bilateral, regional, or international aspect. Indonesia has been actively promoting various bilateral and regional inter-faith dialogue initiatives as part of its efforts to realize Indonesia’s vision as a bridge-builder and peace-maker.

Indonesia urges other IPU member parliaments to formulate laws on youth empowerment which is aimed particularly at enhancing young people’s participation in the democratic process. In this regard, Indonesia has legislated a Law on Youth: the 2009 Law number 40 on Youth. Indonesia also has long recognized the importance of youth development and has had a Ministry dedicated to youth barealy a year after our independence.

Thank you.

WOMEN PARLIAMENTARIANS WORKING GROUP on WOMEN TRAFFICKING

Statement by the Indonesian Delegation

The 122nd Asssembly Meeting of the Inter-Parliamentary Union

Bangkok, Thailand March 27th – April 1, 2010

Indonesian Intervention

Nova Riyanti Yusuf, MD, Psychiatrist

Thank you madam Chairman,

Fellow Parliamentarians,

Distinguished Delegates,

As delivered by the delegate from Jordan, Indonesia has a huge number of migrant workers, especially women, which lies on socio-economic problems of the women such as poverty and unemployment. And due to unfortunate circumstances, those women become victims of trafficking.

As Indonesia has passed several national laws concerning trafficking in women and children, most importantly, our law No.14/2009 regarding the Adoption of the Protocol to Prevent the Prosecution and Punishment of Human Trafficking, especially Women and Children.

We believe that taking into consideration the extraterritorial nature of women trafficking, parliamentarians of IPU member countries should persuade their respective governments to establish a common agreement between the sender and destination countries to protect the rights of the women who become the victims of trafficking.

As the implementation of the protection itself there should be further and thorough discussion on the effectiveness and fully-committed joint cooperation. It is not only aspect of law, but also the damage (physically and psychologically) upon the victims who return to their countries of origin.

Thank you.

Women in Politics Debate

Statement by the Indonesian Delegation

The 122nd Asssembly Meeting of the Inter-Parliamentary Union

Bangkok, Thailand March 27th – April 1, 2010

Debate

Nova Riyanti Yusuf, MD, Psychiatrist

Thank you madam Chairman,

Fellow Parliamentarians,

Distinguished Delegates,

We would like to share how Indonesian female legislator candidates went through the most recent Legislative General Election in 2009. For quite some time, psychologically and physically we were prepared for the Zipper system or 30% quota reserved for female legislator candidates but in 6 months or so prior to the general election we were taken by surprise when our Supreme Court announced the system changed from Zipper System into Popular Votes system.

Within short notice, we had to quickly adjust ourselves. We weren’t busy with the political lobbying but more on persuading the constituents in our electoral basis.

The result of the Legislative General Election was not bad, but also not that great. Somehow we managed to secure 18.4 % of the seats for female legislators in the House of Representatives.

It is understandable why I said not bad because according to IPU report, the year 2009 was marked by continued progress for women in parliament. The global average for the proportion of women in parliament reached an all-time high of 18.8%.

Based on our very own experience and also absorbing the difficulties by female politicians throughout the world, interventions indeed still need to be done.

We still expect a growing number of women in politics, specifically in the House of Representatives. However, despite the amazing strife by undying Indonesian female politicians last year, we recognized that the progress to empower women in political arena may take some time. Some questions emerged, such as why women won’t vote for women, which it got nothing to do with esthetical reason, but could be the cultural context in Indonesia which is still heavily patriarchal. Therefore we never stop conducting advocacy to women citizens about how to empower themselves to be politicians. The role of existing MPs as role models to young women, as well as political education. Not only we will get more women to serve as Member of Parliaments, but also female parliamentarians who can hold strategic posts in the House of Representatives such as chief of commissions and even Speaker of the House.

Indonesia House of Representatives would like to press issue that the strategies to increase women participation in politics may vary between countries depending on their cultures, electoral laws and even their progress in democracy process. We just want to give fellow distinguished delegates the process we’ve been through last year and the silver lining of the Popular Votes system strongly reminded us that it is the people to lobby, to empathize with, not the high-rank officials from political parties.

Thank you.